• April 23, 2024
 What is the procedure for proving a missing or lost Will?

What is the procedure for proving a missing or lost Will?

By Alexa Payet, Partner at Bolt Burdon and listed specialist in the Certainty Contentious Probate Hub & Area

Initial steps

When an individual dies it is necessary to search their paperwork to establish whether they made a Will and gather information regarding their estate. This is important because the personal representatives of the estate have a legal duty to distribute the estate correctly and could be held financially responsible for any mistakes made through any breach of duty.

Where a Will cannot be found but is believed to exist there are a number of steps that can be taken to help confirm its existence, including (but not limited to) the following:

  1. making enquiries of the deceased’s family and friends;
  2. making enquiries with the deceased’s professional advisors;
  3. instructing The National Will Register to undertake a Certainty Will Search.

Presumption of revocation

Where the original Will is known to have been in the testator’s possession before their death and cannot be located afterwards, there is a rebuttable presumption that the Will was destroyed by the testator with the intention of revoking it. If an order for the proof of a copy is to be obtained then this presumption must be rebutted.

Procedure for proving a copy Will

The procedure for proving a copy Will is set out in Rule 54 of the Non-Contentious Probate Rules 1987 (‘NCPR’).

The application is made to the Probate Registry at which the application for the grant will be made and the order can be made by a district judge or registrar.

The application must be supported by evidence in the form of an affidavit (although during the global pandemic the rules have been amended by the Non-Contentious Probate (Amendment) Rules 2020, SI 2020/1059, to provide for the use of witness statements as an alternative to affidavits).

The evidence must set out the grounds of the application and any available evidence that the applicant can adduce as to the Will’s existence after the death of the testator or, where there is no such evidence, the facts on which the applicant relies to rebut the presumption that the Will was destroyed by the testator during his/her life.

The applicant must ensure that the Court has the best available evidence of what happened to the testator’s Will in order that effect may be given to his/her testamentary wishes.

It is important to understand that the applicant does not need to demonstrate that the Will has been lost (it is the fact of its loss which gives rise to the presumption of revocation). Instead, the applicant must establish, by evidence, that the Will was not in fact revoked.

What is a Certainty Will Search and why is it necessary?

A Certainty Will Search searches for Wills that have been registered on The National Will Register (circa 8.7 million Will registrations in the system) and for Wills that have not yet been registered in geographically targeted areas where the deceased used to live and/or work. A Certainty Will Search is extremely important as it will be necessary to notify the probate registry of any persons who would be prejudiced by the grant if the copy Will is proved. If no such person exists then the registrar is more likely to grant the application. Alternatively, if such a person does exist then you should seek to obtain their written consent to the application. The written consents can then be lodged with (or following) your application.

This article was submitted to be published by Certainty: The National Will Register as part of their advertising agreement with Today’s Wills and Probate. The views expressed in this article are those of the submitter and not those of Wills and Probate.

The National Will Register

http://www.certainty.co.uk/

Certainty the National Will Register is the UK’s provider of a National Will Register and Will Search service. Certainty Will Search and Will Registration is exclusively endorsed by the Law Society, recommended by key organisations and used by thousands of solicitors, the public, charities and financial institutions to register Wills and search for Wills. At peak times, one Will is registered every two seconds on The National Will Register. The confidential contents of the Will are not disclosed, only the existence and location of where the Will is stored is recorded, ensuring that it can be found quickly and easily once the Testator has passed on. Registration ensures that if beneficiaries and executors are unaware if a Will was written or have forgotten where it’s located, it can be easily found by conducting a Register Will Search. The existence of a Will and its location are confidential. Only when the Testator has passed away can a Will’s location be declared. Even then, it will be disclosed only when the person searching for the Will has a genuine, bona fide interest and that person can provide a copy of a death certificate. Certainty Will Search not only searches for registered Wills but also nationally for Wills that have not been registered to help prevent an old Will being used to distribute the estate or when the existence of a Will is unknown. In addition, Certainty the National Will Register provides an online Will management tool for solicitors, which can be accessed remotely from anywhere with a secure internet connection so they can safely register Wills, search for Wills and use additional services Certainty the National Will Register provides for professionals. For more information, please contact us on 0330 100 3660 or email enquiries@certainty.co.uk. Address The Chapel Chapel Lane Lapworth Warwickshire B94 6EU