Proffered

https://www.proffered.co.uk/

The process of executing probate can be highly taxing, especially when property is involved. The traditional estate agent takes on average 6-9 months to sell a property – this can draw the probate process out considerably, causing prolonged and unnecessary upset. That’s without considering the risk of an offering falling through (which currently happens to 1 in 3 sales).

Proffered is a property investment specialist simplifying the way people sell probate property in the UK. We partner with a variety of solicitors and probate professionals to provide a tailored and seamless selling route for their customers. We offer home sellers a fast and guaranteed alternative to the open market, and can facilitate a sale in as little as 7 working days.

Our technology led approach to valuations means we can provide an accurate, competitive offer fast. Alternatively, if the property has already had an independent valuation, we can use this as the basis of our offer.  We then agreed a completion date with the seller, and expedite the legal and conveyancing processes to fit in with our client's timeframe.

Our service means we can offer will executors certainty and security that a property sale won’t complicate or delay the probate process.


Key Services

  • Guaranteed sale
  • Bespoke Time Frame
  • Fully Managed Process

Address

Prince Frederick House
35 39 Maddox Street
London
W1S 2PP

Tel: 0203 984 0439


Key Contact

Name: Adam Bonner
Tel: 0204 551 0888
Email: [email protected]
LinkedIn Account: Adam Bonner

Name: James Baker
Tel: 0204 551 0897
Email: [email protected]
LinkedIn Account: James Baker

Interest Organisations Wills & Probate Market

In a world of diminishing inheritances, quick probate property sales

A recent survey shows that 18% of adults aren’t planning to leave an inheritance to their children, and reveals that further declines are to be expected.  The survey, conducted by Opinum shows that 7% will instead leave their estates to grandchildren, or other family members, to avoid monies being subject to inheritance tax twice.  But further studies have also revealed […]Read More

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